Source: Radio Liberty

Dr Monteith exposes the organized attack against the people of America and the World. There are people who don’t think like WE THE PEOPLE do. There are evil people in the world who would rather see most of us dead. Dr. Monteith goes over the means and ways of the wicked that have a different world view than you and I. Learn about some of the things you know and what you don’t know about them.

NOTE: PLEASE BE PATIENT – VIDEO HAS 30 SECONDS OF BLACK LEVEL BEFORE IT STARTS PLAYING.

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3 Responses to “None Dare Call It Genocide – Dr. Stanley Monteith”

  1. Ed Howes says:

    No matter what name we should apply, I believe our set up, for the past 3 generations has been pre natal, as in discouraging mothers of my mother’s generation to breast feed their babies. The 100+ year war on family. Surely the remedy must be the re empowerment of the disempowered dependents. But first a word from our sponsors.

  2. Enter the Stockholm Syndrome, Ed. I believe we are all being subjected to this via government actions, including undeclared wars, false flag attacks, black ops, and legislation intended to further our captivity and at the same time appear to be beneficial:

    The following are viewed as the conditions necessary for Stockholm syndrome to occur.

    Hostages who develop Stockholm syndrome often view the perpetrator as giving life by simply not taking it. In this sense, the captor becomes the person in control of the captive’s basic needs for survival and the victim’s life itself.[1]

    The hostage endures isolation from other people and has only the captor’s perspective available. Perpetrators routinely keep information about the outside world’s response to their actions from captives to keep them totally dependent.[1]

    The hostage taker threatens to kill the victim and gives the perception of having the capability to do so. The captive judges it safer to align with the perpetrator, endure the hardship of captivity, and comply with the captor than to resist and face murder.[1]

    The captive sees the perpetrator as showing some degree of kindness. Kindness serves as the cornerstone of Stockholm syndrome; the condition will not develop unless the captor exhibits it in some form toward the hostage. However, captives often misinterpret a lack of abuse as kindness and may develop feelings of appreciation for this perceived benevolence. If the captor is purely evil and abusive, the hostage will respond with hatred. But, if perpetrators show some kindness, victims will submerge the anger they feel in response to the terror and concentrate on the captors’ “good side” to protect themselves.[1]

    In cases where Stockholm syndrome has occurred, the captive is in a situation where the captor has stripped nearly all forms of independence and gained control of the victim’s life, as well as basic needs for survival. Some experts say that the hostage regresses to, perhaps, a state of infancy; the captive must cry for food, remain silent, and exist in an extreme state of dependence. In contrast, the perpetrator serves as a ‘mother’ figure protecting the ‘child’ from a threatening outside world, including law enforcement’s deadly weapons. The victim then begins a struggle for survival, both relying on and identifying with the captor. Possibly, hostages’ motivation to live outweighs their impulse to hate the person who created their dilemma.[1][6]

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stockholm_syndrome

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stockholm_syndrome
    2 seconds ago ·

  3. Ed Howes says:

    Thanks Barbara for all you are doing to inform the uninformed. Though this predates my awareness that WWIII is being fought, possibly since the end of WWII, it becomes ever easier to see the weapons of choice are corporate toxins causing disease. In the food, air, water and even our laundry, the ignorant are the primary targets and their care givers are secondary, as in the military strategy of taking three people out of the fight by only wounding one who then requires assistance. What is totally unique, or seems so, is the victims assist the aggressors.